Poducts

  • The Other Side of Cooperation: Cooperative Mines in Bolivia

    A miner enters the mine at the beginning of a day’s work. (Photo by Andrea Marston.) The Other Side of Cooperation: Cooperative Mines in Bolivia Andrea Marston. The city of Potosí, Bolivia seems to exist against the odds. Perched at a nose bleeding altitude of 13,000 feet, sun scorched by day and teeth-numbingly cold by night, Potosí leaves

  • Cerro Rico Wikipedia

    FENCOMIN (National Federation of Mining Cooperatives in Bolivia) was a vital player in insuring the successful popular election of Evo Morales and also functioned as one of the leaders in drafting Bolivia's new constitution establishing a plural mining economy (state, private, and cooperative). However, over the last ten years much conflict has arisen between cooperative miners and state

  • Coordinates: 19°37′8″S 65°44′59″W /
  • Mining in Bolivia Wikipedia

    翻译此页Overview
  • Cooperative miners and the politics of abandonment in

    01/12/2015· The National Federation of Mining Cooperatives of Bolivia (FENCOMIN) demanded that Article 151 be restored to its original state, which permitted cooperative miners

  • Cited by: 13
  • What’s Behind Bolivia’s Cooperative Mining Wars? | NACLA

    What Bolivia’s cooperative mining wars have revealed, in stark terms, are the growing contradictions and perils of an extractivist-dependent economy at the end of the commodities bonanza, as the government and popular sectors struggle to control a dwindling mining surplus. As Gudynas notes, the real debate should be over the mounting social

  • Behind the deadly Bolivian miner cooperative protests

    One of the most significant demands was rejection of the General Law of Cooperative Mines, which guaranteed cooperative employees the right to unionise. The cooperative owners do not want their workers represented by unions.

  • Gold Fever Grips Bolivia, but at What Cost?

    The political power of the gold mining cooperatives stems in part from their numbers: There are currently some 130,000 cooperative miners in Bolivia, the majority of which are gold miners. Add on

  • Bolivia, Potosi, Cooperative Mine Tour, Potosi Hill

    Download this stock image: Bolivia, Potosi, Cooperative Mine Tour, Potosi Hill (Cerro Rico), mine interior, miners working C4BRMT from Alamy's library of millions of high resolution stock photos, illustrations and vectors.

  • Show Mines of Bolivia: Potosi Cooperative Mines

    The mine is owned by COMIBOL, Bolivia's national mining company, and mined in a partnership with Franklin Mining, Bolivia S.A., a subsidiary company of Franklin Mining, Inc. The idea is to increase silver production by the introduction of modern mining technology. This might push Boloivia to be one of the biggest producers of silver in the world.

  • Bolivia Cooperative Mines | Samuel Jeffery

    Posts about Bolivia Cooperative Mines written by Samuel Jeffery

  • Visit the cooperative mines in Potosi, Bolivia

    Visit the cooperative mines in Potosi, Bolivia. Alison Adey. Adventure Bolivia Fun stuff! Potosi South America. Plannng to visit the cooperative mines in Potosi? Prepare to be shocked as you experience the terrible working conditions that thousands of men endure every day. Many work in total darkness for 12 hours straight – usually without food and water – extracting minerals such as

  • Cooperative Mine Tour in Potosi, Bolivia

    06/07/2011· Cooperative Mine Tour in Potosi, Bolivia Molly McHugh. LoadingUnsubscribe from Molly McHugh? Potosí, Bolivia Mine Tour | World's Deadliest Mines Duration: 8:44. Christian Krantz 1,046

  • 作者: Molly McHugh
  • A visit to the Cooperative mines in Potosi, Bolivia

    A visit to the Cooperative mines in Potosi, Bolivia At one stage, Potosi was the richest city in the whole of South America, with an outlandish amount of silver on offer, the Spanish mined the area until it was pretty much exhausted. Now, there are remnants of a city rich in history but by and large it's time has come and gone. Mining still continues in what is the deemed the highest city in

  • Bolivia's New Mining Law Global ResearchGlobal

    21/04/2014· Recent protests surrounding the New Mining Law by the cooperative sector in Bolivia climaxed to dangerous levels. The approval of the law was stalled when legislators modified the project in the Legislative Assembly. They claimed that an article allowing cooperatives to sign third-party contracts with private or foreign capital was unconstitutional and removed it.

  • Bolivia, Miner In The Potosi City Stock Image Image of

    Potosi UNESCO in Bolivia the world`s highest city 4070m. A ranbow-colored mountain Cerro Rico the working silver mines. The picture present the miner in cooperative mines

  • Bolivia’s Desperate Miners Are Doing Desperate

    02/03/2017· Despite this manpower advantage, the cooperatives aren’t particularly productive, accounting for only about 30 percent of Bolivia’s mining output. State and

  • Visit the cooperative mines in Potosi, Bolivia

    Visit the cooperative mines in Potosi, Bolivia. Alison Adey. Adventure Bolivia Fun stuff! Potosi South America. Plannng to visit the cooperative mines in Potosi? Prepare to be shocked as you experience the terrible working conditions that thousands of men endure every day. Many work in total darkness for 12 hours straight – usually without food and water – extracting minerals such as

  • A visit to the Cooperative mines in Potosi, Bolivia

    A visit to the Cooperative mines in Potosi, Bolivia At one stage, Potosi was the richest city in the whole of South America, with an outlandish amount of silver on offer, the Spanish mined the area until it was pretty much exhausted. Now, there are remnants of a city rich in history but by and large it's time has come and gone. Mining still continues in what is the deemed the highest city in

  • Bolivia's New Mining Law Global ResearchGlobal

    21/04/2014· Recent protests surrounding the New Mining Law by the cooperative sector in Bolivia climaxed to dangerous levels. The approval of the law was stalled when legislators modified the project in the Legislative Assembly. They claimed that an article allowing cooperatives to sign third-party contracts with private or foreign capital was unconstitutional and removed it.

  • Cooperative miners and the politics of abandonment in

    In Bolivia, cooperative activities wield significant influence over national mining politics. They have become a powerful representational voice for the mining sector, generally supporting, rather

  • Autonomy Overshadowed: A Bolivian Cooperative within the

    cooperative mine with a state-managed one that has been studied in detail by Nash (1973, 1976, 1979). Historical Background The three major mining enterprises in Bolivia were national-ized after the revolution of 1952. By 1956, the state mines and the government that depended on them for its financial base were on the verge of bankruptcy. The reasons for the disaster have been analyzed by

  • Part 1: Cooperative Miners in the Nationalization Process

    28/05/2007· As the mining industry slowly rebounded through the 1990’s, cooperative miners became perhaps the most important players in Bolivia’s mining sector. Many small cooperatives or “artisan miners,” use rudimentary mining techniques and earn modest wages. However, some cooperatives have grown into medium operations with the assistance of investors who buy into the cooperative. Today

  • Potosí Mines, Bolivia | Ethical Considerations

    04/06/2019· The mines at Cerro Rico overlook the city of Potosí. Antonio told us that the mine that we would be visiting was a part of his old co-operative and therefore a place he knows like the back of his hand. Although there are several levels to the mine, we would only be visiting the first two.

  • Mining Cooperatives – GOMIAM

    In Bolivia, most miners work in cooperatives. However, cooperatives are exempt of paying most taxes. The philosophy behind this policy is that the cooperatives have a social function. Originally, they were the ‘escape route’ for many thousands of miners that were fired after the state gave up state mining companies in the 1980s. As cooperatives, they obtained concessions to continue mining

  • Bolivian co-operatives clash with government

    Mining co-operatives play an important role in Bolivia, which produced 9,093 tonnes of tin-in-concentrate from mine operations in the first half of 2016, down 8% on the same period of 2015, according to recent government statistics. The co-operative share in total production was 17%.

  • Bolivia’s Mine Nationalization of South American Silver

    17/07/2012· These events come as a result of a larger structural tension in Bolivia’s mining sector: heavily dominated by transnational and cooperative mining interests that extract and export primary resources leaving nothing for the Bolivian public, with still limited state capacity to control its exploitation and encourage diversified development, particularly strengthening of the self-government